Tuesday, May 16, 2017

A Better Sustainable Sanitary Pad

Each year, nearly 20 billion sanitary pads, tampons and applicators are dumped into North American landfills every year, and it takes centuries for them to biodegrade inside plastic bags, according to a 2016 Harvard Business School report. Additionally, it requires high amounts of fossil fuel energy to produce the plastic for these products, resulting in a large carbon footprint.
University of Utah materials science and engineering
student Amber Barron (left) and materials science
and engineering assistant professor (lecturer) Jeff Bates
 are part of a team that has developed a new, 100-percent
 biodegradable feminine maxi pad that is made of all
natural materials and is much thinner and more
 comfortable than other similar products. 
But a team of students led by University of Utah materials science and engineering assistant professor (lecturer) Jeff Bates has developed a new, 100-percent biodegradable feminine maxi pad that is made of all natural materials and is much thinner and more comfortable than other similar products.

The SHERO Pad uses a processed form of algae as its super-absorbent ingredient, which is then covered with cotton and the same material that makes up tea bags. The result is a maxi pad that is effective, comfortable to wear and can break down anywhere from 45 days to six months.

“This is novel in comparison to other biodegradable options out there for pads,” said Amber Barron, a University of Utah junior in materials science and engineering who is on the team of four students. “Most are really bulky because they don’t have a superabsorbent layer.”


Read the Science and Technology Research News - “A Better Sustainable Sanitary Pad.”

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