Saturday, May 6, 2017

Scientists Scan Horizon for Future Invasive Species Challenges

Shipping and mining in the Arctic. The spread of invasive microbial pathogens around the world. Changing agricultural practices. Use of genomic-modification tools. Those are among the 14 most significant issues that could affect the science and management of invasive species over the next two decades, according to an international team of ecologists, who published their findings in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution.
Shipping and mining in the Arctic. The spread of invasive
microbial pathogens around the world. Changing
agricultural practices. Use of genomic-modification tools.
 Those are among the 14 most significant issues that
could affect the science and management of invasive
 species over the next two decades, according to an international
 team of ecologists, who published their findings in
 the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution.
“Environmental, biotechnological and sociopolitical trends are transforming risks of invasion worldwide. We have identified some potential game-changers,” says Prof. Anthony Ricciardi (McGill University), who led the study by 17 scientists from eight countries.

The journal article stems from a workshop organized by Prof. Ricciardi at the University of Cambridge last September, which gathered some of the world’s leading ecologists.


Read the Science and Technology Research News story - “Scientists Scan Horizon for Future Invasive Species Challenges.”

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