Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals

Would you advise someone to flap towels in a burning house? To bring a flyswatter to a gunfight? Yet the counsel we hear on climate change could scarcely be more out of sync with the nature of the crisis.
Wimbledon, London, UK. 27th April, 2015. A waste management company named Dirty Harry uses a poster of Lord Kitchener to urge the public to recycle.
Wimbledon, London, UK. 27th April, 2015. A waste
management company named Dirty Harry uses a poster
of Lord Kitchener to urge the public to recycle.
The email in my inbox last week offered thirty suggestions to green my office space: use reusable pens, redecorate with light colours, stop using the elevator.
Back at home, done huffing stairs, I could get on with other options: change my lightbulbs, buy local veggies, purchase eco-appliances, put a solar panel on my roof.

And a study released on Thursday claimed it had figured out the single best way to fight climate change: I could swear off ever having a child.

These pervasive exhortations to individual action — in corporate ads, school textbooks, and the campaigns of mainstream environmental groups, especially in the west — seem as natural as the air we breath. But we could hardly be worse-served.

While we busy ourselves greening our personal lives, fossil fuel corporations are rendering these efforts irrelevant. The breakdown of carbon emissions since 1988? A hundred companies alone are responsible for an astonishing 71 percent. You tinker with those pens or that panel; they go on torching the planet.


Read the story by Martin Lukacs on The Guardian - “Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals.”

No comments:

Post a Comment