Thursday, May 17, 2018

Climate change risk for half of plant and animal species in biodiversity hot-spots

Up to half of plant and animal species in the world’s most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked.
Unchecked global emissions threaten half the plant and
animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas.
The Amazon, Miombo Woodlands in Southern Africa, and south-west Australia are among the most affected places in the world, according to new research.

Even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2°C target is met, these places could lose 25% of their species according to a landmark new study by the University of East Anglia (UK), the James Cook University (Australia), and WWF.


Read the report from the University of East Anglia - “Climate change risk for half of plant and animal species in biodiversity hot-spots.”

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